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Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

It's sort of like riding a Moto-Cross or Flat-Track motorcycle. You use the foot pegs like stirrups, to push down, lean forward, etc to control your body english. In my experience, it all depends on the what the horse or bike is doing and your legs and arms will respond instinctively to maintain or regain control. Sometimes you hug the bike with your legs yet other times you'll bow out your knees to be able to throw the thing around under you.

When you've lost control of your motorcycle and are flying high but with hands still on the grips, we call it "The Flying W!" But its more of a wishbone ... :-0

Bikes are easier I think. The problem with horses are they have their own mind, and when they are hungry and heading for food, you may find yourself along for the ride but not in control. I discovered the benefit of the western style saddle horn one evening when my horse bolted as I was in mid mounting with only left foot in stirrup. Durned thing galloped all the way home knowing it was dinner time. Had to empty my boots after that surprise!

Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

so in actuallity what the correct figures would be is the ones that dont sit on the horses and fall off?

tom

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

All depends on the posture of horse you choose to the figure.Horse Standing (no matter) trotting cantering galloping(stand high in the stirrups) running.Dont forget when a horse takes a pee ,you should be standing in the stirrups.Good rider and horse work as one.

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

fair enough,so say for example the italeri british light cavalry set with the poses of horses.having all figures with legs straight outwould be considered accurate?

tom

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

That's hilarious, Hank. And lets not forget that an experienced rider should give the horse a good shake at the end, too!

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

A few other things to remember:

- There were differing "fashions" of riding; the Prussians, for example, tended to ride with longer stirrups than other nations, thus would have stretched legs.
- When charging, you're supposed to come up out of the saddle, just like when galloping normally, or jumping for that matter.
- On the other hand, when a horse bolts I for one was taught to sit back in the saddle rather than lift myself up.
- Then again, especially later in the Nappy wars, many cavalrymen were in fact lousy riders, so might just do inappropriate things.
- And yes, horses are very annoying around dinner time!

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

Thank you, Duco, for your facts.

Hank and I sound like Jokers but we're not in this case. Not totally, in any case ... :-)

The releif thing is of course in humour, but horses, riders, European Saddles, Western Saddles, and of course a riders individual riding style should factor into the situation ... both Professional or Amateure.

I'm with your opinion, in the end! Cheers, Mate!

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

No worries Dave- believe me, when riding horses you need a sense of humour too!

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: cavalry figures, Motorcycles & Horse Sense, Too

Dave Its no joke.Oh btw dont try that manoeuvre on a motorcyclette.people in TExas high street may not like you doing that.