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Re: Re: Re: Your advise is required

I can't come up with much better than anyone else has. Some superb ideas have been offered here, and you would do well to use some of them.

What came to my mind was...
Carthaginians - They've been done pretty much, so you might not want to do that.
Gauls - Some of these have been done before as well.
Celts and Britons - A personal favorite of mine, I was just about to beg for a chariot...it seems that HaT has one on the way, plus Boudicca!

I was also thinking that the civil wars might be good too, as others said before.

As to other people's suggestions, Jewish rebels and even Yo Yo Ma's Spartacus idea are all great.

There's a lot to do out there, so I'm sure whatever it is, it'll be a pleasing subject.

Regards,

CivilWarDinosaur

P.S. We do need Han Chinese badly!

Re: Re: Re: Your advise is required

Dear Pol,

it is good to have you here again.
You know that the basreliefs of Trajan's column showed accurately all the helmets, armor and equipment that were found by archaeology. But before those findings, the accuracy of the column was very much doubted. Why not trust the Louvre basrelief, as it was a contemporary depiction of praetorians - where they augustan, flavian or antonines? Not finding a helmet as depicted on the basrelief does not mean that it did not exist. Considering the entire outfit of those praetorians as parade dress, is only an unfounded assumption. From the 3 figures on the foreground, only one is identifiable as an officer, the one with the knotted sash tie-belt, as it was common with high-ranking officers. Considering all the figures officers, is another illogic assumption.
The painting in the Golden House of Nero, shows a praetorian with silvered and gilded bronze lorica segmentata of Corbridge type, Etrusco-Corinthian crested helmet and greaves. And then there is of course the Cancelleria relief in Rome, for another praetorian.
I don't understand why the historical accuracy of a set depicting those figures on the basreliefs would be nil?! Oh yeah, now I remember you doubting a lot of things.

About the clibanarii from 69 AD, I have to appologize, as I wrote the last sentence in a hurry, called by pressing matters. Well, here is a quote from John Warry, Warfare in the Classical World, p.200: "Fully armoured cavalry had existed in the Roman army since AD 69 when Sarmatian cavalry had been employed by Vespasian." This happened in the Year of the 4 Emperors, when Vespasian with his Danubian legions obtained by force the throne. The first mentioning of a regular roman cataphract unit is under Hadrian (117-138), right?

Regards

Re: Re: Re: Re: Your advise is required

Hi,

"Oh yeah, now I remember you doubting a lot of things."

No reason to get personal, okay?

As for the bas-reliefs, I think your arguments are not conclusive.

Regarding Traian's column, the arms and armour shown there are basically correct but, at the same time, very much stylized. There is a lot of artistic licence and convention in these representations of Roman soldiers. Contrary to what you said, before the progress of archaeology and the many original objects that were found as a result, most scholars thought that the depictions of soldiers on Traian's column and other reliefs were absolutely precise and accurate (just look at the reconstructions of roman soldiers in so many books published before the 70s).
As for the Louvre relief, I did not claim that all the figures were officers. I said that they are high ranking officers and guardsmen in what is thought to be parade dress. Again: this relief was heavily restored, so it's pointless to go on discussing its accuracy here.
I clearly don't approve of your trying to "prove" your views by arguing that what hasn't been found could still have existed, which basically is true, of course, but in itself is no proof that something has actually existed. I could equally well argue the other way round and claim that what has not been found has never existed. Here we are in the realm of beliefs and speculation. Definitely not a serious way of debating controversial issues.
The painting in the Golden House is special in so far as it appears to show a combination of hellenistic-style parade dress and, perhaps, field dress (lorica segmentata), but this outfit clearly was not actual field dress as can be glanced from what Tacitus tells about the battle near Cremona (AD 69) where, apparently, legionaries and Praetorians wore the same armour and were distinguishable only by their shield devices.
The Cancellaria praetorians, led by what appears to be a beneficiarius, are wearing neither parade nor battle dress, but some sort of everyday service dress. Again it's basically the same as that worn by legionaries (tunica, focale, paenula). If some manufacturer decided to make a set of Roman soldiers dressed like this I'd certainly not mind. Useful for both legionaries and praetorians in everyday service uniform.
As for Roman heavy cavalry units I'd say yes, the first appear to have been raised under Hadrian.

Best regards

problem solved: no more need for praetorians!

I would delete now my option1 from the suggestions to Strelets, as I see no more need for praetorians. Alanger is making them. Equipped for battle, with crests and specific shields. Signifer with lionskin.
They seem fine to me, as this is the most probable way they looked on the battlefield.

Re: problem solved: no more need for praetorians!

Strelets could make them in other poses. We still lack sets of Romans who are standing on Parade ground etc.

"The Civil War" by Julius Caesar

One only has to read "The Civil War" by Julius Caesar to get an idea for possible future sets by Strelets.

With the tradition of ongoing struggles within the forces of Rome, you could literally pick which time frame and rival leaders to choose from.

With a thousand years of history, the possibilities are definately endless.

Fighting in the east

Hi guys,

what would you think about a Palmyran army and a corps of Roman Dromedaries?

When I thought about Strelets Minisets I had more the later Imperial fighting guys in mind which are around 150-200 AD than the marching ones.

Most of the wars of this time were fought against the German tribes and in the east.

Of course earlier wars of Rome are still be very interesting. What about the sack of Rome 357 BC when we have Roman hoplites fighting the Celts or a civil war army with Caesar troops against the Augustians (which we can destroy in the Teutoburg forest).

But the main question was what enemies could be done to fight the new Miniset guys. So I have still the Jews and Germans in mind. Maybe another set of Parthians to have more poses beside HAT's excellent set?

cheers
uwe

Re: Fighting in the east

More Parthians would be nice, especially as I don't subscribe to your view that the HaT Parthians are "excellent" (No, I'm not In Dubio ). My absolutely personal assessment of HaT's Parthians (friendly version): (Golden)

Cheers

Re: Re: Fighting in the east

There can never be enough Parthians and Sassanids on the market

cheers
uwe

Re: Your advise is required

The army of Mithridates, King of Pontus if the roman set would suit the time of around 88BC. the roman war against Pontus held hugh importance for the romans, as it carried their empire into asia. Pompeys roman army against Mithridates greek/asian army what more could one ask for?

Re: Re: Your advise is required

The only late-republican set proper for a fight with Mithridates is Italeri 1st century BC. Few poses, gladius scabbard on the right on one pose.
So many roman sets, and only one caesarian

Re: Re: Re: Your advise is required

Sorry, I wanted to say "gladius scabbard on the LEFT (and that is wrong) on one legionary pose"

Parthians

My vote would be for the Parthians and Isrealites, as
quality sets of the Gauls and Germans have already been made. A civilian set like the medievil england set would be good and why not yet another set of gladiators.

Re: Your advise is required

Why not all of the suggestions so far, slowly but surely over the next few years produce all of Romes's enemies ancients like Napoleonics are always popular. Most collectors, wargamers, painters, love this era, and the figures I believe would be big sellers. I know that looking at the posts on this thread that I would buy most if not all of the figures suggested if they were to be produced.

Re: Your advise is required

Coming from colchester, a set showing Boudica and her army would be brilliant.