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Re: Good start for a week

Accuracy within the hobby is a varied thing, which certainly divides opinion.
I am someone who wouldnt call himself a "button counter"....but I do insist on the basics being correct. So the main points of a uniform, correct equipment etc etc.

So if these guys are not ment to have helmets, then that for example would be a problem for me if I was doing the era. But if there is plenty of doubt as to what was worn, then it wouldnt bother me.
As for French Nap fusiliers dressed in coats or tunics....I dont mind how they come, so long as they are done correctly equipment wise, (single combined cartridge box and bayonet belt for fusiliers but seperate belts for flank etc), and if they are flank companys, then they have the epaulettes on their shoulders as well....coat or no coat.

I appreciate Flambeau & others offering the information on various subjects. It is indeed up to the individual whether they are that bothered. Its just simply putting the info out there for those who want it. For those who arent worried in terms of their figures, it can still be interesting reading and knowledge. And for those who like some "mini realism", it is obviously extremely helpful.

As for the old Airfix French Cuirassiers being converted, i often flirted with the idea of using them in some form, but what I couldnt get away from was the fact that they just dont seem to have the "presence" of what was heavy cavalry. Then the sabre sheaths were missing which is a real pain.

Re: Good start for a week....old Airfix Cuirassiers R.I.P

Roger W


As for the old Airfix French Cuirassiers being converted, i often flirted with the idea of using them in some form, but what I couldnt get away from was the fact that they just dont seem to have the "presence" of what was heavy cavalry. Then the sabre sheaths were missing which is a real pain.
Couldn't agree more Roger.

There were three sets of Airfix cavalry available when I started out on my 'wargaming odyssey' around 1973. Two were the 'Waterloo' French and British cavalry; the other was the US Cavalry. Airfix Cuirassiers got used as: Cuirassiers, Dragoons, British heavy dragoons, British Household cavalry (with plastic wood helmet crests), ditto Carabiniers, even French lancers. All Hussars started life as the Waterloo British set and, despite their rolled up sleeves, the US cavalry became British light dragoons with French infantry heads. These were desperate times indeed.

But there was no getting away from the fact that the British Waterloo cavalry (Hussars) were much bigger and chunkier, and their horses were just slightly better.

I am grateful therefore to the Airfix French Waterloo cavalry for services rendered in the past...and I probably bought around 25-30 sets of them. But they had their day a long time ago, and retired forever to a plastic 'Les Invalides'.

Re: Good start for a week....old Airfix Cuirassiers R.I.P

Minuteman,

I still use the old Airfix British hussars as 7YW Austrian Hussars :sunglasses: as well as for Waterloo, never liked the Esci hussars that much. They may be a wee bit too big, but they still are ok - well, minus the kettledrummer, the "lancer" and perhaps the trumpeter. And they're pretty easy to convert into hussars with shakos.

Re: Good start for a week....old Airfix Cuirassiers R.I.P

Flambeau,

Yes, the Waterloo British Cavalry set had/has its virtues; the sculpts are robust and half of the poses are quite good. The horses are not great, but even so. Employing these as SYW hussars is a good use for this veteran set.

There are so many 'If only...' questions with the Airfix Napoleonic/Waterloo range, that are now disappearing into the mists of time. If only they had made the Hussars set to the same scale/style as the Cuirassiers; or in fact preferably, made the Cuirassiers to the chunkier style of the Hussars. if only they had made a decent set of French artillery; if only there had been at least one officer on foot in the British infantry set, and a standard bearer. If only the French infantry set had had some much better poses (proper march attack, proper marching with musket on left shoulder, proper advancing with levelled musket, better drummer, better bugler, proper Porte Aigle and Eagle.....and not been so 'chunky'.

But we did what we could with them...and, I have to admit, I still use the British infantry set as part of my 1815 Hundred Days Anglo/Dutch/Belgian/Hanoverian army.:blush:

Re: Good start for a week

Strelets
Gentlemen,

finally, we've got a terrific day here in London, hopefully, it will set a standard for a week and a month after:slightly_smiling_face: .


Best regards,

Strelets
Ohhh !! Amazing master... brava Strelets !! ( Again !! )

Re: Good start for a week

I think the mention of London also served to drive my mind toward ECW at first, then thought "ohh, this must be WoSS related."

As you guys have stated I think this chap will be useful in some fashion, whether as an Austrian or something else. Maybe WoSS archaeological evidence can help? Albeit battlefield archaeology for that was is in its infancy. Maybe government written records? Because yea, paintings are pretty unreliable, sadly.

I would like to sympathise with Flambeau's statement and mention that Strelets does have a bad tendency to give too much armour to its sets in general. Not every Roman has to have armour, armoured Dacians were rare, ship borne Vikings as well as Ancient Germanics were almost entirely u armoured, and WoSS French pikemen with breastplates were rare (at best). They are all still useful in the right contexts, but for future reference it is ok to eschew the armour and focus on their clothing.

Re: Good start for a week

Sorry for the typos... I am not smart with smartphones! :joy: :sweat_smile:

Re: Good start for a week

Yeah well, as to the reliability of sources: paintings, when were they executed? 20 years after the event? Was the painter present? Did he paint to show how things actually looked or just to please the eye of his patron? Uniform regulations? Were the items ever issued and if when? Memoirs? Were they written 20 years later when the authors memory was already fading? No source is actually 100% reliable. The best thing we get is probability. Even battlefield archeology won't help much, as the fields were usually scrupulously plundered. And: a fancy helmet might survive in the ground whereas two thousand tricornes just rot away. So you find the surviving helmet and deduce that's what everybody was wearing ... I think the pictures are a good starting point if we keep in mind they probably show just a part of the truth.

Re: Good start for a week

An prudent archaeologist would hypothesise the presence of a single helmet example on a battlefield means one guy, or at most a mix of guys in the pertinent units, wore them.

A combination of as many sources as possible of course in most cases ideal, which seems to be the way forward here.

Anywho, sculptors of Strelets, consider sets with little to no armour or helmets in the future please. 😎

Re: Good start for a week

As soon as I get my hands on them they will be painted up as Brits, this guy is straight out of Osprey and works for me, right number of buttons or not.

Re: Good start for a week

Alan Buckingham
As soon as I get my hands on them they will be painted up as Brits, this guy is straight out of Osprey and works for me, right number of buttons or not.
Wont those helmets bake their heads in the desert Alan? 😉😁

Re: Good start for a week

Alan Buckingham
As soon as I get my hands on them they will be painted up as Brits, this guy is straight out of Osprey and works for me, right number of buttons or not.
If 'this guy' is straight out of the Barthorp/McBridge 'Marlborough's Army' title (plate D) then he is an Austrian Cuirassier circa 1705, with a grey coat and dark red facings. British cavalry of the WoSS looked nothing much like this. So painting these figures as WoSS British would be a little like painting Zulu Wars British Infantry as British Infantry at Omdurman....something quite different.

However, you may be thinking of painting these as English cavalry of the Restoration (Charles II) era, in which case much better: replace any tricornes with broad-brimmed felt hats and you're on to a winner!