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Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

Flambeau
#Roger, Napoleon missing his line foot artillery? There's an excellent set by Zvezda, you know?
The big set is for pre 1813 and the art of tactic set for 1813-1815 doesnt float my boat, not a fan of any of the art of tactic sets.

I agree though the Zvezda big set is an excellent set. I like that you get a limber and caisson included.

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

The equipment is pretty universal, but you are right about the uniforms. I actually used the old Airfix set as gunners. But it's still worth buying if only for the guns, limber and caisson.

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

The equipment modelled while maybe fiddly to put together, is definately some (if not the best) artillery out there in the Zvezda set.

As for Airfix French artillerymen, I cant bring myself to use them. They just look far too much like trolls and probably belong in a Lord of the Rings diorama!

Maybe just producing late war foot artillerymen rather than the guns as well, would be a better proposition? More varied poses firing or reloading etc, some marching alongside their guns etc?
Then they could just get put alongside guns etc from sets such as Zvezda's, providing scale is matched.

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

#Roger,

yeah, well, the Airfix artillerymen come with some problems, the size, the shako, no trousers, the backpack (probably discarded when actually serving the cannon).
But then there's uniform and regulation uniform. Just checked my copy of the Freyberg manuscript for the 1813 campaign, and there were still lots of soldiers (including artillery) wearing pre-Bardin uniforms. Field's book on Waterloo ("The French perspective") even quotes general Petit to the point that the French used 8pdrs in the battle, something that officially never happened. Given the state of supplies post the 1812 campaign, and the lacklustre interest of the royalists to invest in the military after Napoleon's first abdictation, I suppose we should not be astonished if oudated, non-regulatory equipment still found its use even in 1815.

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

More excellent figures, well done again to the sculptor.

I'm guessing from the reference to 'Red' here that this is a set of British Dragoons in Reserve, in which case very useful.

I note another mounted drummer however, when actually we need a cavalry trumpeter 'at rest' please. Drummers are limited to dragoon regiments, and in this period c. 75% (or more) of the mounted arm of any army would be cavalry rather than 'dragoons'.


Have a good weekend:relaxed:

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

These have some of the best horses ive seen lately.
Out standing strelets, can you now apply the horse standard to future Nappy sets please.
Many thanks keep up the great work

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

Wonderful figures!
I think too, that they are british cavalry. I will buy certainly some boxes...

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

These are more lovely looking figures. To all the experts out there who's knowledge on WSS is far greater than mine, what makes these dragoons rather than line cavalry? Is it the one cross belt (compared to the two on the other British cavalry set released)? Could these figures fill in for other types/nations as well?

Re: Friday Weather: Drought in Desert, High Red Tide in the Low Lands

#Rich,

lovely figures indeed. As to what makes them French Dragoons, have a look at the discussion above. Generally speaking I suppose they will do for other nations (line) cavalry/horse as well, with some small changes as cutting away the cartridge box on the belt. The horses are perhaps more problematic if you want to use them for line cavalry, there should be two holsters on both sides of the saddle, no shovels or other equipment. Dragoons usually looked much the same as line cavalry (with some notable exceptions), the difference was in how they were used (as mounted infantry) and in their pay. It seems that British dragoons however were rarely used as infantry, but in the same way as "horse", only that they were payed less. So some regiments were designated "dragoons" for purely economical reasons. The "Horse" (Line) cavalry of some nations also (sometimes) had the better/heavier horses and might also have a (front) cuirass. There were a lot of subtle differences though. Try to get hold of a copy of C S Grant's "Armies and uniforms of Marlborough's wars" if you want more detail.