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Re: Friday- topic for today? Head-swopping

I agree. I have performed many hundreds of 'head operations' on figures in my collection, and I always pin the heads using a wire spigot as well as glue: it gives a perfectly strong fit and is better than simply gluing.

HOWEVER: It is not for everyone. It is difficult to do unless you have practice in doing it, requires good eye-sight and manual dexterity, and the right tools...and lots of time and patience.

I think that manufacturers should approach this with a view that their customers WILL NOT wish to fiddle about with head-swops. If this is intended then sets with neatly fitting heads with spigots and holes to accommodate them in bodies need to be provided, with extra heads. This will all add to the cost and complexity of production.

In 1/72 the set should be what it says it is on the front and sides of the box. Let's try to keep this simple.

Re: Friday- topic for today? Head-swopping

I think of head swaps as an extra. So 48 one piece figures that make up the norm of the specific army being done and then a few extra heads to be used for head swaps. That way the kids are happy, and those who don't want to do head swaps are happy, and those who want specific units that don't merit their own specific set have a route to get those unique figures by swapping heads.

https://bunkermeister.blogspot.com/2019/07/new-heads-for-old_20.html

Here are a few examples of what I have done, and I am no master modeller.

https://bunkermeister.blogspot.com/2008/06/head-swapping.html

This details the procedure.

Mike Bunkermeister Creek
Bunker Talk blog

Re: Friday- topic for today?

Dear Strelets,

I'm sure enjoying your Beau Geste early 20th century style Foreign Legionnaires! I can see these latest masters to be used in scenes of bivouacing legionnaires, and while serving on a fort's garrison, whether both on and off duty.

Le cafard was a fact of life for those in far off saharan outposts such as Fort Zinderneuf. Can they find relief in a bottle of wine? Or I'm reminded by the man with a dog ... If you want unconditional love, get a pet. These latest masters really give personality to a most interesting military group of soldiers.

What fun! GC

Oh, and P.S. - I'm also hoping to see some Casualty poses.