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Re: Bank Holiday Present

There is only one word: "excellent." I really want me to be able to acquire all of these boxes promised, shown but not accessible. For me it's quite painful to have the smell of the dish, without having the food in the mouth. I like it a lot. Thank you Strelets.

Best regards

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Agreed Messr Zouave, each figure is a thing of beauty.
A marvellous set Strelets and I'm sure that they will go like hot cakes once the War of Spanish Succession devotees (and recent converts) are able to get them.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Just wow.

This is a real wargames' unit with a range of useful & dynamic figures (including 3 command ones) and some of Strelets' nicest horses.

You should be proud, Strelets.

donald

Re: Bank Holiday Present

All seems perfect to me!!! Well done Strelets, you are really μερακλήδες...(it is a Greek word which means that someone makes his job with both skillfulness and love)

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Amazing job boys !!!

Re: Bank Holiday Present

WOW absolutely superb, my compliments to your sculptor, can't wait to get a few boxes of them , excellent addition to WSS range , keep them coming, really made my day
cheers Old John

Re: Bank Holiday Present

These figures are really special and the high standard reminds me of the Perry’s in 28mm.

It is wonderful to see how far Stretlets have come in such a short time.

The quality and production are light years away from the early releases.

A fantastic effort.

Best wishes,

Chris

Re: Bank Holiday Present

This is a great looking set which must rank amongst the very best that Strelets have produced to date. The horses are especially good and the sculptor deserves a lot of praise for a job very well done.

Enjoy the Bank Holiday.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

I agree with everyone, talking about the engraving of horses and figurines. Indeed Strelets and his sculptors achieve a mastery of their certain art. If the French cavalry is on the same level, it promises me hours of work.

Congratulations for your entire team.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

By way of caveat, the pictures are quite small and I think with British cavalry tactics of the period, I'm unconvinced that anyone would be carrying drawn pistols into battle, or discharging them other than as an alarm signal while on picquet duty! I am unlikely to want to field repeats of such poses, so would probably convert.

THAT SAID, this is an essential set for WSS and from what I have seen, these look superb. Some of the best horses I've seen from Strelets, too.

Well done and thank you Strelets!

Expect to buy them in significant numbers when released.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Really tasty.

Dear Strelets, please make your staff work harder, or faster, or smarter or whatever to get these guys on the shelves as quickly as you can, soon as you like, thank you very much.

Firearms in battle

Edwardian
I think with British cavalry tactics of the period, I'm unconvinced that anyone would be carrying drawn pistols into battle, or discharging them other than as an alarm signal while on picquet duty! I am unlikely to want to field repeats of such poses, so would probably convert.

d.
The WSS is not a period I have much expertise in but I would like to raise the issue of the use of firearms in battle by cavalry.

As you know, the WSS is a transitional period in warfare. The greatest innovation was the use of bayonets by the infantry. This meant pikemen were redundant & cavalry, perforce, began to change their tactics that previously included extensive use of firearms by troop-types such as the harqubusier. This is not to say firearms were especially effective even in this preceeding period & Adolphus, for example, preferred his Horse to use edged weapons over pistols & musketoons etc. using firearms in any melee following the charge. This tactic was copied by Cromwell &, to a lesser extent, by Rupert in the ECW but was by no means universal.

But to get to the period in question, I believe that the the continental cavalry regiments of the WSS period still used carbines & pistols before drawing swords in the final part of the charge. In the attack, the front rank fired their musketoons etc at close range, the weapon was held by a bandoleer and was dropped after firing, then all ranks charged with the sabre. In an ensuing melee, pistols well might be drawn to be used at "point blank".

Marlborough's cavalry, however, charged, at the trot, with swords, which gave them a decided advantage over the French, for example, who would still stop to fire, in a charge (see Blenheim). You make the point that firearms would be difficult to use & not especially effective. This is so but does not preclude their use IMO by the French if not, as you say, the British. I would add that I believe only three rounds of ammunition for their firearms were only issued to British cavalry unless going on piquet duty but I may be wrong in this. However, even with limited ammunition, might a British trooper, in melee , draw & use his pistol? I am also not sure that all British cavalry (as distinct from dragoons) were issued with a long arm but I think some were &, if not, a sharp blade might become useful if some "surgery" was needed here by the modeller.

So to get to the figures in question. Certainly, they show a range of fighting techniques that give importance to the sword. The two figures using pistols are probably unhistorical in a charge & strict accuracy would suggest that you might not want to use them but I think changing gun for sword is not too difficult a proposition. If you wished to model a unit in melee, you may well get away with a limited use of such figures.

I thank you for bringing up this important point.
As I began, I am not an expert and expect to have my Opinions corrected.

donald

Re: Firearms in battle

Donald,

I think you make very good points. I don't disagree.

You draw the important distinction between the French and the Brits in terms of cavalry tactics and firearms. From what I've read, what you say is right.

So, I suppose there are two elements:

(i) I would not be expecting British to use firearms at all in the attack. This is unlike the French; if we get, say, French "Light" Cavalry, we'll want some toting carbines.

(ii) I would not expect any cavalry to be attacking with pistols as these were a supremely useless combat weapon, of more use as an alarm on picquet duty than as a killing weapon in battle (unless you throw it at someone!)

Thus, to devote two poses(a relatively high proportion in a cavalry set) to pistols is not, as Plastic Soldier Review might say, the best choice.

That said, it's a tiny niggle. As you say, it's not impossible that they would be used in extremis in a fight, so I'll keep one of each pose, convert one to a highway man (!) and be looking to give others swords. So, very far from a deal-breaker.

An excellent and useful set.

James

Re: Firearms in battle

An interesting debate, thanks to Edwardian and Paintdog for their thoughts.

Whilst ideally all troopers in this excellent set would be brandishing swords, it is impossible to say that Malburian cavalrymen in battle might or might not have resorted to pistols at close quarters. Instances occur periodically in first-hand accounts of warfare throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, through to the Napoleonic Wars, in which use of firearms by cavalrymen in melee is mentioned - quite often in the context of weapons mis-firing; or firing but missing altogether!

The ideal verses the possible (or the possible that is usually not) does after all occur in many sets in 1/72 plastic. I have often wondered how often soldiers really revert to clubbed muskets except when out of ammo and as a last resort, and how often 2nd world war infantrymen would be lunging or bayonetting downwards...at what exactly?

Converting a pistoleer to a swordsman is relatively easy if you have a suitable arm (with sword); there are times when a spare arm or two in a set like this is useful. For my GNW forces, which are based largely on the figures produced by Zvezda, the Russian infantry pikeman sometimes has his sword arm replaced with the pistol arm from the Swedish mounted dragoon...who then becomes a more properly-armed Swedish cavalryman. If any army of the period favoured cold steel more than the forces of Marlborough, it was the army of Charles XII.

I'm very much looking forward to buying this new English cavalry set when it reaches the retailers.

Re: Firearms in battle

Pictorial evidence from the period (especially paintings and tapestries) routinely show English and Allied cavalry using pistols in battle, especially in a melee or in pursuit of fleeing French infantry. Whether such pictorial evidence is fully accurate in terms of depicting tactics is an open question, as much of the artwork of the period was stylized - the "cavalry melee in the foreground" is almost a trademark of 17th-18th century battle painting. Nonetheless, it would appear that pistols were used on more than just picquet duty and the men with pistols could fit very well on the two least active horses.

Re: Firearms in battle

Samogon
Pictorial evidence from the period (especially paintings and tapestries) routinely show English and Allied cavalry using pistols in battle, especially in a melee or in pursuit of fleeing French infantry. Whether such pictorial evidence is fully accurate in terms of depicting tactics is an open question, as much of the artwork of the period was stylized - the "cavalry melee in the foreground" is almost a trademark of 17th-18th century battle painting. Nonetheless, it would appear that pistols were used on more than just picquet duty and the men with pistols could fit very well on the two least active horses.
Thank you for this information.

I understand artistic license can distort reality. I am aware of the period illustrations of Napoleonic uniforms that can be naively incorrect. An artist sometimes sees what he wants to see.

At the same time, I am very hesitant to reject such primary source material. It's certainly food for thought.

donald

Re: Firearms in battle

Very interesting further contributions on the pistol question, thank you. As I say, I'm not minded to exclude these poses, just limit the repeats in my ranks in favour of conversions to sword arms. It's perhaps more a question of a preference than a necessary correction, though, in an ideal world, set designers would bear in mind such feedback, as it's intended to be constructive.

As I understand it, and IIRC (never certain, these days) the cold steel doctrine was introduced by the Swedes and adopted by the English/British*, the French retaining the older tactical doctrine at this point in time.

Which brings me to the subject of French cavalry. While I am really, really thrilled at the prospect of a maison du roi set, with various units thereof represented, please, Strelets, do not make that the only French cavalry set. Please make a set for the far more numerous line "light" cavalry, the equivalent of the English troopers we're discussing here.

And mounted and dismounted French dragoons, of course!

* As I intend to represent the Blenheim/Ramillies end of the conflict, I will have English and Scottish, rather than British, regiments. Others, may represent units post the 1707 Act of Union, so will have British units. Sometimes in these posts, it's just easier to use the term British as a shorthand. I hope that will not offend.

Who you fought for is gloriously fluid in this period. For instance, while all soldiers of the same monarch, and uniformed similarly, English and Scottish troops are different establishments at the time of Ramillies, perhaps rather as British and Hanoverian troops are later in the Century. And then there is the question of who is paying you and under whose command you fight; more Scottish regiments fought in Dutch pay and under Dutch command than fought in Queen Anne's pay and under her officers. IIRC the Danes there fought in Dutch service, too.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Good figures and best strelets horses.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Absolutely superb set, on par with the Revell Austrian 7 Years War Cavalry. Now you will have to produce the Maisson set, and really great artillery for both sides. To not would be too cruel{:-))

Yesterday's Hero

That title will make antipodeans of a certain age hum a JPY tune and leave the rest of you wondering what I am on about (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVSEiveFY7g).

All the discussion of the pistol-wielding figures above got me looking at those particular poses again (darned nice figures) and the one second from the left on the second row is quite familiar. In fact he is a lot like a figure in the Zvezda Swedish Dragoons of the Great Northern War (some of which are amongst the figures that I am painting at present). This leads me to ponder, have sculptors who used to work for Zvezda now moved to Strelets' employ, particularly since the former "lost their way"--certainly as far as 1/72 figures (and we) are concerned?

'Yesterday's heroes' ride again? Strelets may, or may not, wish to enlighten us.

Whatever the case these are simply beautiful figures in keeping with Strelets' excellent standards.

James

Re: Yesterday's Hero

Dear James,

we don't use Zvezda's sculptors.
Best regards,

Strelets

Re: Bank Holiday Present


As in many areas, there are rules, data from behind a desk with a cup of coffee or tea. And there's what happens on the ground during the fight. At this crucial moment, there is only one rule, one goal: "Kill your enemy, not to be killed". The rules are forgotten.

The saddle gun endowment is not thought of as a decoration, which the rider should not use. So if I represent a meling fight scene, the rider with his arson pistol has its place. If I represent a charging scene, the gun is not in order.

That's what I'm thinking of doing and that's just my opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Re: Bank Holiday Present

I remember reading something, sometime, by a Napoleonic British cavalryman who basically said that You couldn't hit a barn door with the pistols so their only use was in a close quarters melee with enemy cavalry. The recommended technique was to press the muzzle into Your opponents face and pull the trigger. Nasty!

These are great looking figures, I'm not interested in the WSS but I'm very tempted to buy a box of these and then work out why I want them. The mixed look of some with swords, some with pistols and one with an ill researched and heraldically unsound flag might work well for me. I'll be having a look at them to see if one, or bits from several, of them wants to be a Hangman.

I have to say that I sense a real discipline problem here though. I have an ominous feeling that if I do buy this set then a couple of those guys armed with pistols are going to desert the army and pursue a career as highwaymen.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Graeme


I have to say that I sense a real discipline problem here though. I have an ominous feeling that if I do buy this set then a couple of those guys armed with pistols are going to desert the army and pursue a career as highwaymen.
Well, it was a volatile time and a dangerous one for travellers. And there's a theme here, what with the piratical French Grenadier wielding his cutlass and now highwaymen deserting from the English cavalry and lurking as well!! Not to mention the professionally bloodthirsty mercenary Irish, Scots, Swiss and others mentioned above....All very colourful from the (relative) safety of lockdown in the second decade of the 21st century.:slightly_smiling_face:

Re: Bank Holiday Present

I had a reminder of how relatively lawless life could be. In the same era the pioneering Stockton and Darlington Railway was being built in the North East of England, there was a village on the banks of the river Tees near Stockton that still made its living from plundering any vessel that got stuck on a sandbank.

ATO

Edwardian
I had a reminder of how relatively lawless life could be. In the same era the pioneering Stockton and Darlington Railway was being built in the North East of England, there was a village on the banks of the river Tees near Stockton that still made its living from plundering any vessel that got stuck on a sandbank.
Of course there are contemporary plunderers worse than any in history. I'll mention the ATO.....

donald

Re: ATO

Australian Taxation Office?

Differing approaches to tax are interesting. When I lived as an ex-pat, I was lucky being a Brit, because HMRC was content for me to be taxed on the basis of my residence, provided I intended to be abroad for at least a couple of years. My Canadian friends could get their tax authorities to do the same, but only if they had severed links with Canada; burnt their house down and shot their dog before leaving. Worst off, however, were those from the US, because Uncle Sam taxes based on citizenship, not residence or domicile. There is nowhere the IRS won't follow them. So much for live free or die.

Re: ATO

Edwardian
Australian Taxation Office?



Yes, an attempt at levity as WW2 is being re-fought (above).

donald

Re: ATO

Yes, I suspect that tax payers the world over would share your wry humour!

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Edwardian
I had a reminder of how relatively lawless life could be. In the same era the pioneering Stockton and Darlington Railway was being built in the North East of England, there was a village on the banks of the river Tees near Stockton that still made its living from plundering any vessel that got stuck on a sandbank.
Wasn't me!

My village was on the coast not the river. And I know nothing of tunnels under Winkie's Castle or anything coming in on the cobles besides cod and lobster.

Your mention of the Stockton and Darlington pleased me greatly. We've been seeing lots of railway documentaries here lately and most of them seem to think that world history started with the #*$@&^% "Rocket".

I probably should confess that I don't always give Trevithick his due though.

Re: Bank Holiday Present

Me, I’m more interested in the throwaway comment by our hosts above, that they don’t use the Zvezda sculptors. Makes me wonder what happened to them.

But I am Relaxed who sculpts, as long as they do a good job. And the latest Strelets figures are looking very good indeed