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"Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Apart from the Inniskilling dragoons at Waterloo another obvious omission from the ranks of heavy cavalry is the French Horse Grenadiers.
These magnificent 'Big Boots' would be a great subject for both at the ready (at ease) and charging.

I know that Strelets are capable of producing some wonderful examples of these long-overlooked cavalry-men.

Any chance? Please Strelets

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

If you excuse the obvious connection, then certainly (Marshal) Murat should know better than almost anyone when it is time for the heavy cavalry!

Yes, I would support this. Although the Grenadiers de Cheval of the Garde has been modelled before in 1/72 plastic, the set in question is now very old and rather 'wooden' in its poses, especially the horses, which are rather poor. A new Strelets set, with more poses and much better horses, would be superb.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Murat would also appreciate the role of light cavalry. Napoleon'cheapest lot, the chasseurs aux cheval are due for an update as well. Italeri's set was a disaster and Hat's set with the ringhands( thank whomever you like to thank for manufactures who have discarded these poses) are as wooden as the horse grenadiers.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

This could keep Strelets busy for the whole of next year, maybe longer!! There are many Napoleonic cavalry sets have either never been modelled, or have been modelled a long time ago but badly.

Taking just the French for a start, in addition to the Horse Grenadiers it would be good to have Chasseurs a Cheval as you suggest; a really good set of later Napoleonic French hussars with the tall stovepipe shako; and a set of French line lancers. All could be done well by Streets in their new (Prussian cavalry style) with a set of each 'at ease' and 'in action'....that's six sets (a pair of each) already.

And then there is similar for British/KGL: heavy dragoons, light dragoons and hussars for the 1812-15 period. Another six sets; or perhaps eight if we have separate sets of heavy dragoons and Scots Greys (as suggested elsewhere in this Forum recently)

And after that, a re-modelling of some of Strelets earlier Napoleonic cavalry sets.....

Just one request to Strelets though: Please complete the War of Spanish Succession range before you embark on this Napoleonic wish list.:grin:

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

I think Strelets should finish producing the sets of which we have only seen the masters. Seeing the masters is good, to get an idea of what we're going to do with it. Once we have imagined the situations, the painting, that we have started to make the land, we must be able to buy them and do it. Expecting more and more boxes (as interesting as it is), brings me only frustration and disappointed desire.:stuck_out_tongue: :rage: :boom: :goat:

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

I would love to see the Grenadiers-a-Cheval in their combat uniforms as opposed to their full dress uniforms,as depicted in the Hat set. Like this:

http://horsegrenadiers.blogspot.com/p/to-blog-page-for-horse-grenadiers-of.html

or this image in their winter dress uniforms:

https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/762726886866553437/

Paul K.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

All very fine, no doubt, but the need is surely for 1815-uniformed Line Lancers, Line Chasseurs and Line Dragoons?

Line Lancers have a rather indifferent HaT set and more recent and better sculpted but in accurate modern set (Waterloo 1815?).

Line Chasseurs I'm not sure we have anything for the period.

Line Dragoons we have the very nice but impractical Zvezda Art of Charging a Lot for a Tiny Number of Figures series. Given how many dragoon regiments there were at Waterloo, that's a tad depressing.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Of course these would be a great but I would rather see sets of those types where no one has produced them yet

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Well, if it's types not already produced by someone that means French hussars in chapeaux roleau (try to imagine I spelled that correctly), Grenadiers a' Cheval in plain undecorated surtout, and French dragoons in the Bardan uniform (anything that costs $44 for a set of twelve mounted figures does not count). British hussars in shakos are probably also needed; but I have a distinct bias towards hussars in busbies.

As for all of the other things mentioned, I don't absolutely need them but variety is good so if Strelets make them I'll buy.

Edwardian
nice but impractical Zvezda Art of Charging a Lot for a Tiny Number of Figures series.


:laughing:Well said, I like that!

I'm actually quite grateful that I paid what I did for the very last available box of Strelets Napoleons General Staff Set 1. on e-bay; it means my most expensive set is now something that was worth paying for.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Dear Edwardian,

A couple that you may have missed?

There are the Italeri dragoons. ****ed fine figures that also lend themselves to be Empress Dragoons, Italian dragoons and even Grenadiers à cheval (with a busby added naturellement). Actually, I like the Strelets early carabiniers (an all time favourite set of mine) as the 'big heels'/'gods'—a bit of knife work and a horse swap and they are perfect for mine. That said, it is *amazing* that no-one has produced a standout set of the finest cavalry unit of the period.

For chasseurs à cheval, the Hat figures are simple but fine figures for mid-Empire types, but there is a bit of a gap for early and to some degree later. The Italeri ones are nice, though require a horse swap in the main. Plenty of conversion potential (painting or otherwise) with them.

Not meaning to be too picky, but, there were only the 2e and 7e dragon at Waterloo. The rest were with Grouchy (Excelmans corps that had been at Ligny on the quiet French right). That said, dragoons feature prominently at Austerlitz, Jena and particularly Eylau & Friedland (not to mention the Peninsula, some in Russia and back in France in 1814). All 12 regiments of cuirassiers were at Waterloo—a droolful delight on the tabletop!

Regards,

James

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Hi. New to forum.
What about the Netherlands? No Dutch/Belgian Carabiniers or Hussars. Only the Light Dragoons have been made....then only the one sort.
Maybe not related to "heavy" cavalry but I think a good decent set of British Hussars & Light Dragoons also need be made. Not at full charge but either standing awaiting orders or at the walk preparing to charge. Swords drawn. No standard bearers though!

If did do the heavies,should be at the charge to recreate the Union Brigade charge. Scots greys with UNCOVERED head dress i think would sell well. May not be historically accurate but they would look fantastic!

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Ask yourself, are they any use in the Desert 1941/43 if answering yes carry on campaigning , if No , give yourself a stern talking to and then ask for something of use like LRDG or SAS , or Africa Korp tank crew or heavy weapons, none of you have tables big enough for MORE cavalry anyway :joy:

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Alan Buckingham
Ask yourself, are they any use in the Desert 1941/43 if answering yes carry on campaigning , if No , give yourself a stern talking to and then ask for something of use like LRDG or SAS , or Africa Korp tank crew or heavy weapons, none of you have tables big enough for MORE cavalry anyway :joy:
Afrika Korps vehicle crew (including drivers and passengers) get a definite 'yes' from me, ditto heavy weapons and artillery crews. Less sure about the LRDG and SAS, which rarely managed a 'trooper per square mile of desert' ratio of more than a couple of Chevys and about 6 heroic individuals (1:1 scale) in any one place at one time, dispersion being the key to not being noticed and then strafed mercilessly.

How many square miles of open sand dunes and camel tracks is your table, Alan?

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

The Chevrolet in LRDG service had a crew of three, so six figures would give me two trucks, and I don`t need a big table for that in 1/72. To be fair I don`t wargame, more of a diorama (small) builder, but I no longer have room for a big table having surrendered to big spare bedroom to the boss as another guest bedroom, I am confined to the small bedroom as a hobby space, and that gives me about enough room for me a painting table work bench and my downsized collection.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Alan Buckingham
Ask yourself, are they any use in the Desert 1941/43 if answering yes carry on campaigning , if No , give yourself a stern talking to and then ask for something of use like LRDG or SAS , or Africa Korp tank crew or heavy weapons, none of you have tables big enough for MORE cavalry anyway :joy:
Of course they can be used in the desert. Just need to have them sitting on camels; arm the odd one or two with Stens, and you and I will be in sandy-heaven.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Alan Buckingham
Ask yourself, are they any use in the Desert 1941/43 if answering yes carry on campaigning , if No , give yourself a stern talking to and then ask for something of use like LRDG or SAS , or Africa Korp tank crew or heavy weapons, none of you have tables big enough for MORE cavalry anyway :joy:
There is certainly a more pressing need for LRDG than there is for yet another set of Scots Greys. One charge, one battle, one campaign. Hardly ubiquitous. There are twice as many Scots Grey sets than British Foot Artillery.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

James Fisher
Dear Edwardian,

A couple that you may have missed?

There are the Italeri dragoons. ****ed fine figures that also lend themselves to be Empress Dragoons, Italian dragoons and even Grenadiers à cheval (with a busby added naturellement). Actually, I like the Strelets early carabiniers (an all time favourite set of mine) as the 'big heels'/'gods'—a bit of knife work and a horse swap and they are perfect for mine. That said, it is *amazing* that no-one has produced a standout set of the finest cavalry unit of the period.

For chasseurs à cheval, the Hat figures are simple but fine figures for mid-Empire types, but there is a bit of a gap for early and to some degree later. The Italeri ones are nice, though require a horse swap in the main. Plenty of conversion potential (painting or otherwise) with them.

Not meaning to be too picky, but, there were only the 2e and 7e dragon at Waterloo. The rest were with Grouchy (Excelmans corps that had been at Ligny on the quiet French right). That said, dragoons feature prominently at Austerlitz, Jena and particularly Eylau & Friedland (not to mention the Peninsula, some in Russia and back in France in 1814). All 12 regiments of cuirassiers were at Waterloo—a droolful delight on the tabletop!

Regards,

James
Yes, I also like the Italeri French dragoons, which is a very versatile set, even if the horses are running away with themselves a bit (surely it was the British Heavy cavalry that was more prone to this?). And yes, as James rightly points out, there was a surprising lack of dragoons in Napoleon's army at Waterloo - although they were an important part of the French army elsewhere during the 'Waterloo campaign' as a whole.

It's worth also noting that whilst the French Cuirassier arm was plentiful at Waterloo in terms of units, some of these regiments were mere shadows of the mighty armoured cavalry arm of the earlier days of Napoleon's empire.

If nothing else, there is much that could be done by Strelets in the realms of Napoleonic cavalry which is, let's face it, amongst the most colourful period of them all and pretty much the last time when men on horses could play a decisive role in battle.

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Errrrm HaT have already done the Horse Grenadiers

Re: "Now is the time for the heavy cavalry. I think."

Dear Brian,

Yes, we know. It is an adequate set. The figures look much better painted. The horses are useful for other units too (such as Empress Dragoons prior to having the three-tiered pistol cover).

This is in the greedy, "we want it all" line of having a *fabulous* set of the 'big heels'! I have the Old and Young Guard versions represented, but would happily make another, bigger unit if a fantastic set came along—in some dreamed of future!

Kind regards,

James