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Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Arlin.

My thoughts were that similar scenes probably played out in towns and villages all over Europe when their local regiment first rode out to the wars. And perhaps they met with cheering civilians as they marched through towns along the way.

When I saw these figures I was reminded of the scene in the film "Gettysburg" where a Union regiment marches through a Pennsylvanian town and the citizens come down to their front gate to cheer them and the young ladies come out onto the street to flutter their eyelashes at the young men and make cheeky comments about how the war should be in Virginia.

I think these civilians are great, either for dioramas or just as extra scenery on a war games table. They would have looked terrific in some of Chris Dodson's refights.

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Okay, I guess that would make sense. And it would be cool to have civilians for every era. Just hopefully not all on parade routes. Maybe doing stuff useful. Thanks.

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Agreed, it would be good to also have some civilians just going about their daily business.

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Hi,
My guess is that Strelets is refering to the eary part of the 1813 German campaign when the Prussian army raised troops in a "patriotic " elan.
Many paintings from Knotel and other artists are depicting troops parading with enthusiastic German people around.
Have a great weekend.
CPN

http://www.metropostcard.com/war3e.html

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Other examples:


https://www.preussenchronik.de/bilder/404_Auszug_der_ostpreussischen_Landwehr_1813_ins_Feld.jpeg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Rueckkehr_der_Quadriga-3.jpg/1200px-Rueckkehr_der_Quadriga-3.jpg

I think, i will use the Hussars as 3. Escadron / 9. Hussars Regiment...some of Lützows Riders...

I have visitid the grave of one of Lützows men last year.
Friedrich Leopold Siewerssen has been Oberjäger in Lützow Freikorps. After the war he was Pastor in small town Bosau at the Plöner See. His grave is still there.. :

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Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Okay, now I see. I was wondering what source material was used to pair cheering civilians and Prussians specifically. Perfect, thanks for the link.

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

High level of sculpts...congrats Strelets crew.
But I hope in some set in action poses.

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

Hi, I support the action future sets, hopefully...
Cheers
CPN

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

Why do they have to fit any particular scenario? I figure if this is a new trend we can gather a crowd of civilians for any occasion - it's a win as far as I'm concerned. We get twelve mounted figures with three "extra" civilians? What we call "Gravy" where I'm from.

I am really concerned that all those figures need haircuts. I know troops wore their hair longer than many modern armies but that hair touching their collars really upsets me. I might just have to swallow hard and buy them anyway because they are so beautifully done in every other way. I can even forgive them having carbines - after all they might be detached from their main regiment. Just spitballing here.:wink:

Hair today, gone tomorrow

Wayne W

I am really concerned that all those figures need haircuts. I know troops wore their hair longer than many modern armies but that hair touching their collars really upsets me. I might just have to swallow hard and buy them anyway because they are so beautifully done in every other way. I can even forgive them having carbines - after all they might be detached from their main regiment. Just spitballing here.:wink:



Wayne, have you ever considered the process of cutting hair in the past?

Scissors have been around at least 2000 years but they looked more like sheep shearing implements than what we are used to today. In terms of soldiers' haircuts, I would assume a pair of such shears may not always have been obtainable & the oldest method of cutting hair - grab a hank of hair and use a knife to saw through - would have been the common (& painful) alternative.

There's a reason early barbers were tasked with surgery: in either task, they probably both drew blood.

So scruffy hair would have been the norm on campaign. Please don't get me started on shaving.....
donald

Re: Hair today, gone tomorrow

It still bothers me. I won't even start on the way they're holding their noses... :wink: