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Re: Week-end is nearly there!—such character

Looking again at the master figures for the Prussian dragoons. The character in the faces of the civilians is beautiful to look at. The fellow in this teaser too. Top drawer!

Re: Week-end is nearly there!—such character

Not a Nappy collector but I'm happy for those who are but I am interested in the civilians idea and have some questions. Is it the case that the streltsi are definitely going and will be replaced with civilians? Will there just be one civilian with each set as with the streltsi? Will the civilians match the era of the set?

I hope that is the way Strelets is going. Makes me think of all the previous sets I've bought and the streltsi figures I've piled up as I had no use for them and how I would have loved era specific civilians instead, I'd have had enough people to populate a dark age or medieval village!

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

Strelets

Time for a break:

Have a nice one, gents!

Regards,

Strelets
"Is that who I think it is?"

https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/dancer-fred-astaire-clad-in-top-hat-tails-spats-twirling-news-photo/50605205


I must buy this set!

Wonderful. Dragoons and Civilians

No wonder they hadn't been on the products list; they'd been waiting for the rest of the masters: and what great figures they are.
They will be very useful as cavalry in reserve.

As for the civilians, they will be great for model-railway enthusiasts. They will go well with the Victorian Rocket locomotive and four-wheel coaches that Hornby are bringing out this month.
Arthur Wellesley, The Duke of Wellington, actually traveled on a train pulled by 'Rocket'

The chappie with the top hat (Friday special) would make a great 'Rocket' driver. But I suspect he will be in a different set to the Dragons

Re: Wonderful. Dragoons and Civilians

Excellent sculpting, but no useful poses for me. The flag bearer is superfluous, most have a carbine when only twenty per squadron should have, the guy cradling his sabre, wtf, what a disappointment. But hey, yeah, the sculpting is superb

Re: Wonderful. Dragoons and Civilians

Brian,
I think you’ll find that it’s an officer holding a telescope. A beaut figure for mine.
Some say that they’ll use the standard bearer. I can see an easy conversion to replace with a sword, leaving a really nice, rolled flag to bung on an infantry figure.
Not doubting that they won’t suit you, which is a shame, but fine for those with a lower threshold re. representation according to the recorded regulations.
All the best,
James

Re: Wonderful. Dragoons and Civilians

I'm talking about the first figure, who is definitely cradling a sabre, and not the very obvious officer with telescope but thanks for pointing that out. I'll wait for the "Dragoons in action" set, by which time hopefully these errors, including the trumpeter with a cartridge box, will have been ironed out

Re: Wonderful. Dragoons and Civilians

Yes, I realised that this morning when I looked at them again. I beg your pardon.

Perhaps that fella is saying, "I'll just whip this thing out", Blazing Saddles style? Or maybe he has read the manual that says 'sharp, handle with care"?

Seriously though, could be a recruit of '13 who has received a prized sabre from a veteran of the Seven Year's War or a trooper who has been promoted, perhaps? Interesting representations all. Won't do for the action poses that you are after, mind!

Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

So is there some sort of historical story about a parade of Prussian cavalry marching through a town with all the citizens coming out and cheering them? I am curious why all the citizens look like they are at a parade. And why are they paired with Prussian cavalry types? I don't know much about Napoleonic history, so is this to depict some famous event?

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Arlin.

My thoughts were that similar scenes probably played out in towns and villages all over Europe when their local regiment first rode out to the wars. And perhaps they met with cheering civilians as they marched through towns along the way.

When I saw these figures I was reminded of the scene in the film "Gettysburg" where a Union regiment marches through a Pennsylvanian town and the citizens come down to their front gate to cheer them and the young ladies come out onto the street to flutter their eyelashes at the young men and make cheeky comments about how the war should be in Virginia.

I think these civilians are great, either for dioramas or just as extra scenery on a war games table. They would have looked terrific in some of Chris Dodson's refights.

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Okay, I guess that would make sense. And it would be cool to have civilians for every era. Just hopefully not all on parade routes. Maybe doing stuff useful. Thanks.

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Agreed, it would be good to also have some civilians just going about their daily business.

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Hi,
My guess is that Strelets is refering to the eary part of the 1813 German campaign when the Prussian army raised troops in a "patriotic " elan.
Many paintings from Knotel and other artists are depicting troops parading with enthusiastic German people around.
Have a great weekend.
CPN

http://www.metropostcard.com/war3e.html

Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Other examples:


https://www.preussenchronik.de/bilder/404_Auszug_der_ostpreussischen_Landwehr_1813_ins_Feld.jpeg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Rueckkehr_der_Quadriga-3.jpg/1200px-Rueckkehr_der_Quadriga-3.jpg

I think, i will use the Hussars as 3. Escadron / 9. Hussars Regiment...some of Lützows Riders...

I have visitid the grave of one of Lützows men last year.
Friedrich Leopold Siewerssen has been Oberjäger in Lützow Freikorps. After the war he was Pastor in small town Bosau at the Plöner See. His grave is still there.. :

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Re: Question about these civilians in the Prussian sets

Okay, now I see. I was wondering what source material was used to pair cheering civilians and Prussians specifically. Perfect, thanks for the link.

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

High level of sculpts...congrats Strelets crew.
But I hope in some set in action poses.

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

Hi, I support the action future sets, hopefully...
Cheers
CPN

Re: Week-end is nearly there!

Why do they have to fit any particular scenario? I figure if this is a new trend we can gather a crowd of civilians for any occasion - it's a win as far as I'm concerned. We get twelve mounted figures with three "extra" civilians? What we call "Gravy" where I'm from.

I am really concerned that all those figures need haircuts. I know troops wore their hair longer than many modern armies but that hair touching their collars really upsets me. I might just have to swallow hard and buy them anyway because they are so beautifully done in every other way. I can even forgive them having carbines - after all they might be detached from their main regiment. Just spitballing here.:wink:

Hair today, gone tomorrow

Wayne W

I am really concerned that all those figures need haircuts. I know troops wore their hair longer than many modern armies but that hair touching their collars really upsets me. I might just have to swallow hard and buy them anyway because they are so beautifully done in every other way. I can even forgive them having carbines - after all they might be detached from their main regiment. Just spitballing here.:wink:



Wayne, have you ever considered the process of cutting hair in the past?

Scissors have been around at least 2000 years but they looked more like sheep shearing implements than what we are used to today. In terms of soldiers' haircuts, I would assume a pair of such shears may not always have been obtainable & the oldest method of cutting hair - grab a hank of hair and use a knife to saw through - would have been the common (& painful) alternative.

There's a reason early barbers were tasked with surgery: in either task, they probably both drew blood.

So scruffy hair would have been the norm on campaign. Please don't get me started on shaving.....
donald

Re: Hair today, gone tomorrow

It still bothers me. I won't even start on the way they're holding their noses... :wink: